Angiography

An angiography, sometimes also referred to as an arteriography, is an exam which allows health care practitioners to see how well your blood is flowing through your arteries. With stroke specifically, you may undergo a cerebral angiography which focuses primarily on the arteries in your neck and brain. For this exam, you will first be injected with a dye into one of your arteries. Following this, you will undergo rapid-image X-rays. The dye will allow physicians to determine if there are any blockages or abn

Chan, David. Silver, Frank. (2003). “Conventional angiography demonstrating the mid-basilar stenosis”.  Basilar Artyer Stenosis Mimicking the Lacunar Syndrome of Pure Motor Hemiparesis.  The Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences. Image. 29 May, 2013

Chan, David. Silver, Frank. (2003) “Conventional angiography demonstrating a mid-basilar stenosis”. Basilar Artery Stenosis Mimicking the Lacunar Syndrome of Pure Motor Hemiparesis. The Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences. Image. 29 May, 2013

Procedure

For this exam you will be lying down straight onto an X-ray table. With your head held still, physicians will then insert a needle followed by a long narrow tube (catheter) into an artery near your groin area. The catheter will then be moved deeper into the body, slowly reaching the neck. Once the dye is released, X-ray images will be taken. Once the imaging is complete, the catheter and needle will be removed from the body. You may be given a mild sedative before the procedure to relax your body or prevent discomfort. Once the procedure has finished and the groin area has been cleaned and bandaged, you should keep your legs straight for the next 4–6 hours and ensure no bleeding occurs.